Royal Academy Revolt and English Art in the Nineteenth Century: A Four-Part Course with Hattie Bennett

Royal Academy Revolt and English Art in the Nineteenth Century: A Four-Part Course with Hattie Bennett


Regular price $140.00 Save $-140.00
/

Loading...
Only -7 items in stock!
No events are scheduled at this time. Want to be notified when it’s back? Leave your email address and we’ll notify you.
Want to book this event privately? Send us an inquiry.
Something went wrong while submitting your request, please try again later.
Your request has been sent, you'll be notified of future dates.

The art produced in England during the nineteenth century encompassed a variety of aesthetics. On one hand, it both embraced the past and looked forward to the future, and on the other, it sought to break from the Academic tradition of history painting. We see everything from romantic portraits of the aristocracy and state portraits of the Queen, to abstract renderings of nature’s power, a craze for medievalism, and a desire to recapture the sincerity of Renaissance art. All of these aesthetics speak to the tastes and aspirations that belied the change wrought on the country by the Industrial Revolution.

Led by an expert on Art History, Hattie Bennett, this four-part course will follow the development of English art through the nineteenth century. Designed to inform curiosity as well as future travels, participants will come away with an increased understanding of the production of art and the evolution of style during this period.

Lecture 1: The Regency

This lecture will focus on the art produced in England during the Regency and reign of George IV. We’ll examine the portraits of Sir Thomas Lawrence of the Royal Family, the "fancy" paintings Emma Hamilton (Lord Nelson's mistress) by George Romney, and the landscapes of JMW Turner which became looser and more abstract in his portrayal of nature and the "Sublime".

Lecture 2: The Lure of the Past - Victorian Medievalism

In 1839 the Eglinton Tournament took place, a mock medieval tournament to which European aristocracy flocked reflecting the interest in all things medieval. We’ll discuss how the Gothic revival, first introduced by Horace Walpole at Strawberry Hill in the eighteenth century grew in the nineteenth century to a prevailing national style, with the rebuilding of the Palace of Westminster by Charles Barry and decorated by Augustus Pugin. Re-interpreted by the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and William Morris via Ruskin later in the century, it focused on design and production methods rather than pastiche.

Lecture 3: John Ruskin

This lecture will focus on the great art critic whose career spanned most of the 19th century. Defender of Turner and the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, Ruskin was an enemy of Whistler. His influential books inspired artists to look to the work of the Italian 15th century and to study nature in its entirety. Central to Ruskin's belief was the honesty and morality of medieval artwork, lost in the Victorian mechanical production of art and the decorative arts.

Lecture 4: Painting Victoria

The final lecture will focus on the image of the Queen throughout her reign through public state portraits and private commissions. We’ll also examine Victoria and Albert's favorite artist, Sir Edwin Landseer, who created family (and pet) portraits and whose romantic Scottish landscapes created a vision of the Highlands, peopled by gallant highlanders, stags, and mists.

Hattie has a degree in History of Art and an MA in Historic Interiors, she has a life-long passion and fascination in Fine and Decorative Arts, particularly works produced in Europe from the 16th to 18th century. After working for the Royal Collection in the Print Room at Windsor Castle, she was a curator for a private collector of 17th and 18th century prints and drawings. Hattie has worked for London's foremost framer of important old master paintings during which time she sharpened her appreciation and understanding of the decorative arts and the changing tastes of collecting. Recently she has been dealing in prints and works of art as well as taking groups of all ages to museums and galleries.

 

How does it work?

This is a four-part series held weekly and hosted on Zoom. Please check the schedule for the specific dates and times for each lecture.

Is there a reading list in advance?

Though the course is open to participants with no background in English art, there are suggested readings for further investigation. You will receive this soon after course registration.

How long are the lectures?

Each lecture is 90 minutes long with time for Q&A.

How much is the course?

The course is $140 for four lectures.

Is a recording available?

In general, our courses are not recorded. However, if you need to miss a lecture please let us know in advance and we can arrange for a recording for that session on an individual basis.

This course is suitable for all ages

90 minutes, including a 30 minute Q&A.

Customer Reviews

No reviews yet
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)

Customer Reviews

No reviews yet
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)