Einstein, the Rise of Nazism, and Oxford Refugee Scholars with Victoria Bentata

Einstein, the Rise of Nazism, and Oxford Refugee Scholars with Victoria Bentata


Regular price $36.50 Save $-36.50
/

Loading...
Only -17 items in stock!
No events are scheduled at this time. Want to be notified when it’s back? Leave your email address and we’ll notify you.
Want to book this event privately? Send us an inquiry.
Something went wrong while submitting your request, please try again later.
Your request has been sent, you'll be notified of future dates.

Before Einstein emigrated to the US, he spent three summers in Oxford, invited by Winston Churchill's closest friend, Professor Frederick Lindemann. This is the little-known story of those visits and of the efforts made by Britain's academic elite to save their colleagues and friends from Nazi Germany.

At the beginning of the 20th century, Germany led the way in science, so it is no coincidence that one of the most famous scientists of all time came from Germany. But Albert Einstein was not only German but also Jewish: this would have profound consequences for him personally and even for the reception of his scientific ideas received in his home country.

The Nazi rise to power had repercussions for science not just in Germany. We’ll discuss the sacking of Jewish and anti-Nazi German scientists, their emigration, and the subsequent transfer of scientific expertise elsewhere, notably to the UK and USA. This has been referred to as ‘Hitler’s Gift’. We’ll move to talk about the UK and Einstein’s role as the harbinger of the wave of refugees who were to follow. Invited to Oxford by his friend Frederick Lindemann, head of the Oxford University Physics Department, his presence paved the way for many of his colleagues. We’ll touch on how Einstein also helped to focus attention on what was happening in Germany.

In 1933 William Beveridge, the head of the London School of Economics, later to be the architect of Britain’s ‘Welfare State’ quickly grasped the likely outcomes for Jews and those opposed to the Nazi regime. In particular, he feared for his academic colleagues in Germany. We’ll discuss the organization he helped to set up that saved thousands of his colleagues from ignominy and annihilation. We’ll also learn about the longer-term effects of this organization: ultimately the UK and USA benefitted in all areas of scholarship, though most particularly in science.

Led by an expert on Oxford University and a published author, this interactive seminar will consider the remarkable story of Einstein and the refugee scholars in Oxford. Participants will come away with a greater understanding of a lesser-known impact of the rise of Nazism and its effect on science in Germany, the UK, and the USA.

Victoria Bentata is an Oxford University graduate, published author, and highly experienced Oxford tour guide. She has a particular interest in the history of science in Oxford, its Jewish Heritage, and the Second World War.

This conversation is suitable for all ages

90 minutes, including a 30 minute Q&A.

Customer Reviews

Based on 1 review
0%
(0)
100%
(1)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
E
E.
New information, worthwhile

Customer Reviews

Based on 1 review
0%
(0)
100%
(1)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
E
E.
New information, worthwhile