The Thirteenth Amendment and the Project of Freedom with Dr. Maria Seger

The Thirteenth Amendment and the Project of Freedom with Dr. Maria Seger


Regular price $36.50 Save $-36.50
/

Loading...
Only 0 items in stock!
No events are scheduled at this time. Want to be notified when it’s back? Leave your email address and we’ll notify you.
Want to book this event privately? Send us an inquiry.
Something went wrong while submitting your request, please try again later.
Your request has been sent, you'll be notified of future dates.

How and why has the Thirteenth Amendment advanced both freedom and unfreedom in the United States? Join Dr. Maria Seger for a seminar on what’s at stake in the US Constitutional amendment that attempted to abolish enslavement.

“Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime . . . shall exist within the United States.” Thus reads the first of the Reconstruction Amendments, adopted following the Civil War, intended to outline the future of the formerly enslaved. Upon its passage in 1865, free Black people nationwide rejoiced, giving rise to the emancipation celebration known as Juneteenth.

But while the Thirteenth Amendment might have kicked off a decade of reconstructing the nation, functionally remaking the US Constitution in the process, the death of slavery was unfortunately long. With the Compromise of 1877 ending Reconstruction and the rise of Black codes, debt peonage, and convict leasing across the Jim Crow South, the loophole “except as a punishment for crime” was harnessed to subject Black people to forms of slavery that went by other names.

Tracing the Thirteenth Amendment’s history and deployment from its mid-nineteenth-century passage into the present, we’ll ask questions about how it continues to shape contemporary notions of Blackness and criminality.

Led by an expert on nineteenth-century US literature and culture, Dr. Maria Seger, this interactive seminar will shed light on the Thirteenth Amendment’s history and legacies. Designed to inform curiosity as well as future travels, participants will come away with an increased understanding of the potentials and limits of one of the most celebrated and controversial amendments in US history.

Maria Seger is an assistant professor of English at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, where she researches and teaches US, Black, and ethnic literatures and cultures and critical race and ethnic studies. Her work appears in Callaloo, Nineteenth-Century Literature, and Studies in American Naturalism, and her edited collection, Reading Confederate Monuments, is under contract with the University Press of Mississippi. She earned her PhD from the University of Connecticut in 2016.

This conversation is suitable for all ages

90 minutes, including a 30 minute Q&A.

Customer Reviews

No reviews yet
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)

Customer Reviews

No reviews yet
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)